New in Cinema 4D Release 17 Quickstart: Motion Tracking Workflow

Photo of Cineversity

Instructor Cineversity

Share this video
  • Duration: 09:45
  • Views: 5368
  • Made with Release: 17
  • Works with Release: 17 and greater

Use R17 Lens Profiles and Graph View to Motion Track tricky footage, and render Lens Distortion

Explore the Cinema 4D Release 17 Motion Tracking workflow, with new options to compensate for Lens Distortion and evaluate tracks in a Graph View. Learn how to apply a Lens Profile within the Motion Tracker, and automatically track the footage. Evaluate these tracks in the new Motion Tracker Graph View in order to quickly identify and fix tracks that have errors. Once the 3D scene is reconstructed, you'll use the Lens Distortion Post Effect to render the 3D elements with the same distortion as the original footage.

Learn how to create a lens profile with the C4D R17 Lens Distortion tool.

Less...

Transcript

In Cinema 4D R17, the motion tracker has been updated to work with lens correction for 2D tracking and a motion tracker graph view to help you troubleshoot those difficult tracks. When tracking footage that has lens distortion present, you may notice that those flat planes are never really flat. But by compensating for the lens distortion present in the footage, you can get significantly better results. So let's take a look at how it works. To take advantage of the lens distortion work flow with the motion tracker, you'll have to set up the motion tracker manually. To do this, we'll go to the motion tracker menu, and then select motion tracker. This will add the motion tracker object into our object manager. Next, we want to load in our footage. So we're going to go to the footage tab and then click on the open file button beside the footage link. We then want to select the first frame of our footage. That will load it into the view. Next, we don't want to be working on down sampled footage, so we're going to set the resampling to 100%. This ensures that we're working with the full 1080 P frame. Now, if you take a look at the footage in the view, you'll see that the trees have a fairly prominent curvature, as well as the sidewalk, and the sides of the buildings here. This is going to cause issues with our reconstruction. This is where the lens profile comes in. You're going to start by clicking on the open file button beside the lens profiled link. And then navigate to wherever you saved the lens profile from the lens distortion tool. If you want to find out more about creating your own lens profile, check the link in the description. Now, we'll select the GoPro 4 Hero lens, and we can see in the viewport the lens correction being applied. If we hold alt or option on the keyboard, and then right click and drag in the viewport, you'll see than you can zoom in or out of your footage. Zooming out shows us the full lens correction being applied to the footage here. Now that the lens correction has been applied, we can get into tracking. We'll start by clicking on the 2D tracking tab. This will allow us to set up the attributes for the 2D track. Because we're using such high resolution footage, we want to increase the number of tracks to make sure that we're getting a fairly good number of tracks to use for the final reconstruction. In this case, we'll set it to 1500. Next, we want to set the minimum spacing between tracks. Again, with high resolution footage, we want to increase the minimum spacing to make sure that we're getting a fairly even distribution of features throughout the footage. In this case, we'll set it to 35. Next, we want to go to the options tab. Here, we're going to set up the default pattern size and the default search size for features in the footage. Again, with higher resolution footage, we want to increase the pattern size. This is because the features we want to track might be larger due to the increased number of pixels. So we'll set this to 45, and we'll also increase the default search size. A value of 100 should work fine here. Next, we can go back to the automatic tracking and we're almost ready to go. The last step is to set the frame indicator to frame 80, or about halfway through your footage. This way, when you click on auto track, it will set a key frame at this point in time, and then track forward from this frame, and when that's finished, it will track backward from this frame. This should provide you with a fairly even distribution of good tracks over time. With the 2D track complete, we can then go to the first frame, and hit play just to review our track. If we want to get a closer look, we can hold down the alt key, and then right click and drag to zoom in, and we can also middle click and drag to pan the view. This will give us an easy way to check out our tracks. Now let's just pause that and go back to the first frame. Next, we'll go back to the footage tab, and click full footage so that we can see our full frame. Now, we want to make sure that we're using only the best tracks for our final reconstruction. So, we can go to the 2D tracking and enable the air threshold, or the maximum acceleration, or adjust any of these attributes to filter out the tracks that do not match these values. But sometimes, we want to see more. In this case, we can go to the motion tracker menu, and select the motion tracker graph view. This will open the motion tracker graph view. By default, the motion tracker graph view is going to display a top down view of the tracks in our scene. The color coding is related to the type of information that is being displayed. In this case, we're looking at the 2D tracking errors. If we click one of the toggles up at the top here, we can change between the different types of data. Now, if we go back to the 2D tracking error, the red values are representing a high error value, while green values are showing something that is a low error value, or a good track. So we can see a bunch of these tracks here have high error values. We can click and drag in the motion tracker graph view to select multiple tracks, and then press S to frame the selected tracks or O to go to the first frame of those. We can also hit H on the keyboard to frame all again. Now, we have several different options to try and clean up these tracks. Some of them are only bad for a small section. In this case, we can move the frame indicator around to a point where they start to go bad, and then right click and choose trim track. This will trim off the bad portion of that track. Now, we can see that we have two fairly bad tracks here. If we hold down alt on the keyboard, or option, and then middle click and drag, we can pan the view around. This lets us see that these tracks are pretty much bad the whole time. So we can just hit delete to remove them from the entire scene. The top down view isn't the only way that we can interact with this data. We can go to a graph view. And this is going to display all of the tracks over top of each other. Again, we can use the same shortcut commands to pan or zoom in on the data. If we select any of these lines, it will also select the corresponding track in the view port. This also applies to the top down view. Now, we can see that a lot of these tracks have high error values towards the ends. With them selected, we can just hit delete to remove them from the track. One thing that we can also do here, is if we enable the error threshold in the filter tracks, we'll now see a red line in the motion tracker graph view. We can click and drag this line to adjust the error threshold value. This gives us a quick way to remove our tracks, while having a good visual indication of what we are actually removing. We can also go back down to the top down view and hit H, and see that we have significantly less tracks in the entire scene. But we can be pretty sure that all these tracks are good enough for doing the reconstruction. So, we can close the motion tracker graph view and then go to the reconstruction tab, and run the 3D solver. With the solve complete, we'll go ahead and calibrate the scene. So we'll jump into the solved camera, and then right click on the motion tracker, and choose a planar constraint. We'll then set this to a few of our tracks, and then set our axis to the Y plus. Next, we're going to right click again, go to the motion tracker tags, and add a position constraint. We want to set this to one of our tracks on the ground. With the point constraints set, we want to deselect the point constraint, and then we can take a look at one of our orthographic views. In the front view, we can see that all of the points that should be laying along the ground plane are. So, let's go ahead and set up some scene geometry so we can render this out. We'll start by going to the motion tracker, then to the footage tab, and create a background object. Next, we'll create a floor object, and this is going to line up with the ground plane that we set, and we'll copy the tag from the background to the floor. Then we can right click on the floor, and choose our compositing tag and set it to compositing background. Now, we want to add some geometry to the scene, so we'll go ahead and add a cylinder. We can adjust its size, and then change its position as well as its height. We'll create a couple duplicates of this cylinder, just so that we can see the effect of the lens distortion at different positions and distances. Next, we'll go ahead and render to the picture viewer. With the render complete, we can see that the material applied to the background object and to the floor, is using the original footage. So we have distortion that bends the trees as well as the buildings, and the line along the sidewalks. But if we look at the object in our scene, they do not have any lens distortion at all. This breaks the effect of them fitting into this scene. So, we need to go to the render settings and then to the effect button and here, we can add in a lens distortion post effect. We need to select the lens profile that we used earlier. So click on the open file button, and then locate the lens profile that we used. This will load in the lens profile. If we render to the picture viewer again, you can see that the objects now have the correct distortion applied. With the inclusion of a lens distortion workflow in R17, you can now get significantly better results, right from tracking, all the way to the final render.
In Cinema 4D R17, the motion tracker has been updated to work with lens correction for 2D tracking and a motion tracker graph view to help you troubleshoot those difficult tracks. When tracking footage that has lens distortion present, you may notice that those flat planes are never really flat. But by compensating for the lens distortion present in the footage, you can get significantly better results. So let's take a look at how it works. To take advantage of the lens distortion work flow with the motion tracker, you'll have to set up the motion tracker manually. To do this, we'll go to the motion tracker menu, and then select motion tracker. This will add the motion tracker object into our object manager. Next, we want to load in our footage. So we're going to go to the footage tab and then click on the open file button beside the footage link. We then want to select the first frame of our footage. That will load it into the view. Next, we don't want to be working on down sampled footage, so we're going to set the resampling to 100%. This ensures that we're working with the full 1080 P frame. Now, if you take a look at the footage in the view, you'll see that the trees have a fairly prominent curvature, as well as the sidewalk, and the sides of the buildings here. This is going to cause issues with our reconstruction. This is where the lens profile comes in. You're going to start by clicking on the open file button beside the lens profiled link. And then navigate to wherever you saved the lens profile from the lens distortion tool. If you want to find out more about creating your own lens profile, check the link in the description. Now, we'll select the GoPro 4 Hero lens, and we can see in the viewport the lens correction being applied. If we hold alt or option on the keyboard, and then right click and drag in the viewport, you'll see than you can zoom in or out of your footage. Zooming out shows us the full lens correction being applied to the footage here. Now that the lens correction has been applied, we can get into tracking. We'll start by clicking on the 2D tracking tab. This will allow us to set up the attributes for the 2D track. Because we're using such high resolution footage, we want to increase the number of tracks to make sure that we're getting a fairly good number of tracks to use for the final reconstruction. In this case, we'll set it to 1500. Next, we want to set the minimum spacing between tracks. Again, with high resolution footage, we want to increase the minimum spacing to make sure that we're getting a fairly even distribution of features throughout the footage. In this case, we'll set it to 35. Next, we want to go to the options tab. Here, we're going to set up the default pattern size and the default search size for features in the footage. Again, with higher resolution footage, we want to increase the pattern size. This is because the features we want to track might be larger due to the increased number of pixels. So we'll set this to 45, and we'll also increase the default search size. A value of 100 should work fine here. Next, we can go back to the automatic tracking and we're almost ready to go. The last step is to set the frame indicator to frame 80, or about halfway through your footage. This way, when you click on auto track, it will set a key frame at this point in time, and then track forward from this frame, and when that's finished, it will track backward from this frame. This should provide you with a fairly even distribution of good tracks over time. With the 2D track complete, we can then go to the first frame, and hit play just to review our track. If we want to get a closer look, we can hold down the alt key, and then right click and drag to zoom in, and we can also middle click and drag to pan the view. This will give us an easy way to check out our tracks. Now let's just pause that and go back to the first frame. Next, we'll go back to the footage tab, and click full footage so that we can see our full frame. Now, we want to make sure that we're using only the best tracks for our final reconstruction. So, we can go to the 2D tracking and enable the air threshold, or the maximum acceleration, or adjust any of these attributes to filter out the tracks that do not match these values. But sometimes, we want to see more. In this case, we can go to the motion tracker menu, and select the motion tracker graph view. This will open the motion tracker graph view. By default, the motion tracker graph view is going to display a top down view of the tracks in our scene. The color coding is related to the type of information that is being displayed. In this case, we're looking at the 2D tracking errors. If we click one of the toggles up at the top here, we can change between the different types of data. Now, if we go back to the 2D tracking error, the red values are representing a high error value, while green values are showing something that is a low error value, or a good track. So we can see a bunch of these tracks here have high error values. We can click and drag in the motion tracker graph view to select multiple tracks, and then press S to frame the selected tracks or O to go to the first frame of those. We can also hit H on the keyboard to frame all again. Now, we have several different options to try and clean up these tracks. Some of them are only bad for a small section. In this case, we can move the frame indicator around to a point where they start to go bad, and then right click and choose trim track. This will trim off the bad portion of that track. Now, we can see that we have two fairly bad tracks here. If we hold down alt on the keyboard, or option, and then middle click and drag, we can pan the view around. This lets us see that these tracks are pretty much bad the whole time. So we can just hit delete to remove them from the entire scene. The top down view isn't the only way that we can interact with this data. We can go to a graph view. And this is going to display all of the tracks over top of each other. Again, we can use the same shortcut commands to pan or zoom in on the data. If we select any of these lines, it will also select the corresponding track in the view port. This also applies to the top down view. Now, we can see that a lot of these tracks have high error values towards the ends. With them selected, we can just hit delete to remove them from the track. One thing that we can also do here, is if we enable the error threshold in the filter tracks, we'll now see a red line in the motion tracker graph view. We can click and drag this line to adjust the error threshold value. This gives us a quick way to remove our tracks, while having a good visual indication of what we are actually removing. We can also go back down to the top down view and hit H, and see that we have significantly less tracks in the entire scene. But we can be pretty sure that all these tracks are good enough for doing the reconstruction. So, we can close the motion tracker graph view and then go to the reconstruction tab, and run the 3D solver. With the solve complete, we'll go ahead and calibrate the scene. So we'll jump into the solved camera, and then right click on the motion tracker, and choose a planar constraint. We'll then set this to a few of our tracks, and then set our axis to the Y plus. Next, we're going to right click again, go to the motion tracker tags, and add a position constraint. We want to set this to one of our tracks on the ground. With the point constraints set, we want to deselect the point constraint, and then we can take a look at one of our orthographic views. In the front view, we can see that all of the points that should be laying along the ground plane are. So, let's go ahead and set up some scene geometry so we can render this out. We'll start by going to the motion tracker, then to the footage tab, and create a background object. Next, we'll create a floor object, and this is going to line up with the ground plane that we set, and we'll copy the tag from the background to the floor. Then we can right click on the floor, and choose our compositing tag and set it to compositing background. Now, we want to add some geometry to the scene, so we'll go ahead and add a cylinder. We can adjust its size, and then change its position as well as its height. We'll create a couple duplicates of this cylinder, just so that we can see the effect of the lens distortion at different positions and distances. Next, we'll go ahead and render to the picture viewer. With the render complete, we can see that the material applied to the background object and to the floor, is using the original footage. So we have distortion that bends the trees as well as the buildings, and the line along the sidewalks. But if we look at the object in our scene, they do not have any lens distortion at all. This breaks the effect of them fitting into this scene. So, we need to go to the render settings and then to the effect button and here, we can add in a lens distortion post effect. We need to select the lens profile that we used earlier. So click on the open file button, and then locate the lens profile that we used. This will load in the lens profile. If we render to the picture viewer again, you can see that the objects now have the correct distortion applied. With the inclusion of a lens distortion workflow in R17, you can now get significantly better results, right from tracking, all the way to the final render.
Cinema 4D R17에서는, 모션 트래커가 업데이트되어, 2D 트래킹을 위하여 렌즈 교정과 함께 작업이 가능하고, 또한 모션 트래커 그래프와 함께 작업할 수 있어 어려운 트랙들을 수정하는 데에 큰 도움이 됩니다. 렌즈 디스토션이 존재하는 이미지를 트래킹할 때에는 평평한 플레인이 결코 실제로 평평한 것이 아니라는 것을 아실 것입니다. 하지만 이미지에 존재하는 렌즈 디스토션을 보상함으로서 확실히 개선된 결과를 얻으실 수 있습니다. 이제 이 부분이 어떻게 동작하는지를 살펴보도록 하겠습니다. 모션 트래커를 사용하여 렌즈 디스토션 워크플로우의 잇점을 얻으려면, 모션 트래커를 수동으로 설정하여야 합니다. 이를 위하여 모션 트래커 메뉴로 가서 모션 트래커를 선택합니다. 그러면 모션 트래커 오브젝트가 오브젝트 관리자에 추가될 것입니다. 그 다음, 이미지를 로드하도록 하겠습니다. 이를 위하여 footage 탭으로 가서 이미지 링크 옆의 파일 열기 버튼을 클릭합니다. 그런 다음 이미지의 첫번째 프레임을 선택합니다. 그러면 뷰에 이미지가 로드될 것입니다. 우리는 다운 샘플된 이미지로 작업할 것이 아니기 때문에, resampling을 100%로 올립니다. 이렇게 함으로써 우리는 앞으로 1080 픽셀 프레임으로 작업하게 될 것입니다. 이제 뷰의 이미지를 보면 왼쪽에 있는 나무들이 매우 눈에 띄게 굽어있으며, 보도와 건물 옆면도 함께 굽어있는 것을 보실 수 있습니다. 이로 인하여 씬을 재구축할 때 문제를 일으키게 될 것입니다. 바로 이 것 때문에 렌즈 프로파일이 필요한 것입니다. 이제 렌즈 프로파일 링크 옆의 파일 오픈 버튼을 눌러 작업을 시작합니다. 그런 다음 렌즈 프로파일이 저장된 위치를 찾아갑니다. 렌즈 프로파일은 렌즈 디스토션 툴에서 저장된 것입니다. 렌즈 프로파일 생성에 대한 보다 상세한 사항은 이 튜토리알의 관련 소개 비디오를 참조하시기 바랍니다. 여기 저장된 GoPro 4 Hero 렌즈를 선택하면, 뷰포트에서 렌즈 교정이 적용되는 것을 보실 수 있습니다. 만일 Alt 또는 Option 키를 누른 상태에서 라이트 클릭하고 뷰포트에서 드래그하면 이미지를 줌인 또는 줌아웃할 수 있습니다. 줌아웃해보면 전체 렌즈 교정이 이미지에 적용되는 것을 보실 수 있습니다. 이제 렌즈 교정이 적용된 상태에서 트래킹으로 들어갈 수 있습니다. 2D tracking 탭을 클릭하여 시작하도록 하겠습니다. 이렇게 하면 2D 트랙에 대한 속성들을 설정할 수 있습니다. 우리는 매우 높은 해상도의 이미지를 사용하는 것이기 때문에 트랙의 수를 키워 충분히 양호한 만큼의 트랙 숫자를 확보하여 최종 이미지 재구축에 사용할 것입니다. 여기서는 1500으로 설정합니다. 그런 다음, 최소 트랙 사이의 스페이싱을 설정하겠습니다. 다시 한번, 고 해상도 이미지이므로, 최소 스페이싱 값도 올려 충분히 고른 피쳐들의 분포가 전체 이미지에 걸쳐 이루어지도록 하겠습니다. 여기서는 이를 35로 설정합니다. 이제 옵션 탭으로 갑니다. 여기서는 기본 패턴 크기와 이 이미지에서의 피쳐들에 대한 기본 탐색 크기를 설정합니다. 고 해상도 이미지이기 때문에 패턴 크기도 키우겠습니다. 이는 증가된 픽셀 수 때문에 우리가 트랙하려는 피쳐들이 더 클수도 있기 때문입니다. 따라서, 이를 45로 설정하고 기본 탐색 크기도 키우겠습니다. 이 값은 100이면 충분할 것입니다. 다음, 오토매틱 트래킹으로 되돌아가면 이제 거의 다 준비가 된 셈입니다. 마지막 단계는 프레임 인디케이터를 프레임 80 또는 이미지의 중간 프레임 정도에 설정하는 것입니다. 이렇게 하면, 오토 트랙을 클릭할 때, 비로 이 프레임 인디케이터가 위치한 프레임에 키 프레임이 설정되고, 이 프레임부터 앞으로 트랙하여 끝까지 간 다음, 다시 이 프레임부터 뒤로 첫 프레임까지 트랙합니다. 이렇게 함으로써 시간에 걸쳐서도 양호한 트랙들의 충분히 고른 분포가 제공됩니다. 2D 트랙이 끝나고, 이제 첫번째 프레임으로 가서, 재생 버튼을 눌러 트랙을 검토합니다. 보다 상세히 보려면, Alt 키를 누른 상태에서 라이트 클릭하고 드래그하여 줌인합니다. 또한 미들 클릭하고 드래그하여 뷰를 패닝할 수도 있습니다. 이러한 방법으로 손쉽게 트랙들을 체크할 수 있습니다. 이제 일시 정지를 누르고 첫번째 프레임으로 되돌아 갑니다. 다음, footage 탭으로 가서 full footage를 클릭하여 전체 프레임을 볼 수 있도록 합니다. 이제 최선의 트랙들만을 골라서 최종 재구축에 사용하는 과정을 수행하겠습니다. 이를 위하여, 2D 트래킹으로 가서, error threshold, 또는 최대 가속을 활성화하거나 또는 이들 속성들중 어느 것을 조정하여 이 값들과 일치하지 않는 트랙들을 골라냅니다. 하지만 종종 더 많은 것들을 보고 싶을 경우에는 모션 트래커 메뉴로 가서, 모션 트래커 그래프 뷰를 선택하면 모션 트래커 그래프 뷰가 열립니다. 기본적으로 모션 트래커 그래프 뷰는 씬 내의 트랙들을 탑-다운 뷰로 디스플레이합니다. 칼라 코딩은 표시되는 정보의 유형과 관계됩니다. 지금 우리는 2D 트래킹 오류를 보고 있습니다. 만일 여기 이 위에 있는 토글들을 클릭하면 여러 유형의 데이타 사이를 전환할 수 있습니다. 다시 2D 트래킹 오류 디스플레이로 되돌아가서, 여기서 붉은색 값들은 높은 오류 값을 나타내고, 녹색은 오류 값이 낮은 것 즉 양호한 트랙들을 나타냅니다. 따라서, 여기 이 곳의 많은 트랙들이 높은 오류 값을 가진 것을 알 수 있습니다. 모션 트래커 그래픽 뷰에서 클릭하고 드래그하여 여러 트랙들을 선택할 수 있으며, 그런 다음 S 키를 쳐서 선택된 프레임들만을 키워서 볼 수 있습니다. 또는 O를 쳐서 그들 중의 첫번째 프레임으로 갈 수 있습니다. 또한 H 키를 쳐서 00:05:24.040 --> 00:05:29.380 다시 모든 프레임으로 되돌아갈 수 있습니다. 이러한 오류 트랙들을 제거할 수 잇는 여러 가지 방법이 있습니다. 작은 부분에서 일부만이 오류 트랙일 경우에는 프레임 인디케이터를 배드 트랙이 시작되는 부분으로 옮긴 다음, 라이트 클릭하고 trim track을 선택합니다. 그러면 그 트랙의 배드 부분들을 트림하여 없애버립니다. 이제 이 부분을 보면 매우 많은 배드 트랙들을 보실 수 있습니다. 00:05:50.140 --> 00:05:55.270 미들 마우스를 클릭하고 드래그하면 뷰를 패닝할 수 있는데, 이들 트랙들은 거의 처음부터 끝까지 늘 배드 상태인 것을 보실 수 있습니다. 따라서, 이러한 경우에는 Del 키를 쳐서 이들을 전체 씬에서 제거합니다. 이러한 탑-다운 뷰에서만 이러한 트랙 데이타를 처리할 수 있는 것은 아닙니다. 그래프 뷰로 가면 모든 트랙들을 서로 위에 놓여있도록 표시합니다. 여기서도 동일한 단축키를 사용하여 팬 줌할 수 있습니다. 만일 우리가 이들 선들을 선택하면 뷰포트에서 이에 상응하는 트랙들이 선택될 것이며, 아울러 탑-다운 뷰에도 적용될 것입니다. 이제 여기서 보면 많은 이들 트랙들이 끝으로 갈수록 높은 오류 값들을 가지게 되는 것을 볼 수 있습니다. 따라서, 이들이 선택된 상태에서, Del 키를 쳐서 트랙으로부터 이들을 제거합니다. 우리가 여기서 할 수 있는 또 다른 방법은, 필터 트랙에서 error threshold를 활성화하면 모션 트래커 그래프 뷰에 붉은색 선이 나타납니다. 이 선을 클릭하고 드래그하여 error threshold 값을 조정할 수 있습니다. 이 방법은 빠르게 배드 트랙들을 제거할 수 있으면서, 무엇이 제거될 것인지를 가시적으로 명확하게 보여줍니다. 다시 탑-다운 뷰로 가서, H 키를 치면, 전체 씬에 확실히 적은 수의 트랙들을 갖게 되었음을 알 수 있습니다. 하지만 여기서 우리는 이 모든 트랙들이 재 구축에 사용할 수 있는 양호한 트랙들임을 알 수 있습니다. 이제 모션 트래커 그래프 뷰를 닫고 reconstruction 탭으로 가서 3D 솔버를 실행합니다. 솔빙이 끝나면, 씬을 캘리브레이션할 것입니다. 이를 위하여 solved camera로 옮겨가서 모션 트래커를 라이트 클릭하고 planar constraint를 선택합니다. 그런 다음, 몇개의 트랙들을 선택하고, 축을 Y+로 설정합니다. 그런 다음, 다시 라이트 클릭하고 모션 트래커 태그로 가서 포지션 구속을 추가합니다. 우리는 이 구속을 그라운드 상의 트랙들 중 하나에 설정합니다. 포인트 구속이 된 상태에서, 포인트 구속을 선택 해제하고, 직교 뷰들 중 하나를 보도록 하겠습니다. 프론트 뷰를 보면, 그라운드 플레인을 따라 놓여 있어야만 하는 모든 포인트들이 존재하는 것을 알 수 있습니다. 이제 씬 지오메트리를 몇개 설치하고 렌더링하도록 하겠습니다. 먼저 모션 트래커로 가서, footage 탭으로 가서, 백그라운드 오브젝트를 생성합니다. 그런 다음, 플로어 오브젝트를 생성하고, 이 플로어 오브젝트는 우리가 설정한 그라운드 플레인과 일렬로 세울 것입니다. 그리고 백그라운드의 태그를 플로어로 복사할 것입니다. 그런 다음, 플로어를 라이트 클릭하여 컴포지팅 태그를 선택하고 컴포지팅 백그라운드로 설정합니다. 이제 씬에 지오메트리를 몇개 추가할 차례이며, 실린더를 하나 추가하고 사이즈를 조정한 다음 위치와 높이를 변경합니다. 이 실린더를 몇개 더 복사하여 렌즈 디스토션의 효과를 서로 다른 위치와 거리에서 볼 수 있도록 하겠습니다. 그런 다음 픽쳐 뷰어에 렌더링을 합니다. 렌더링이 끝나면 백그라운드 오브젝트와 플로어에 적용된 재질은 오리지날 이미지를 사용하고 있는 것을 알 수 있습니다. 따라서, 디스토션이 존재하여 나무들이 굽어있고 건물과 보도를 따라서 선들도 굽어있는 것을 알 수 있습니다. 하지만 씬에 우리가 추가한 오브젝트들을 보면, 전혀 렌즈 디스토션이 없어 이 씬에 적용된 효과가 이들 오브젝트에는 반영되지 않았습니다. 그러므로 이제 렌더 설정으로 가서, effect 버튼을 눌러, 렌즈 디스토션 포스트 이펙트를 적용하여야 합니다. 즉, 앞에서 사용했던 렌즈 프로파일을 선택하여야 합니다. 파일 오픈 버튼을 클릭하고 우리가 사용했던 렌즈 프로파일을 찾아 선택합니다. 그러면 렌즈 프로파일이 로드될 것입니다. 그런 다음 다시 픽쳐 뷰에 렌더링을 하면, 효과가 적용되어 정확한 디스토션이 적용된 것을 보실 수 있습니다. 렌즈 디스토션 워크플로우가 R17에 포함되어, 트래킹으로부터 최종 렌더링 까지 항상 훨씬 나은 결과를 얻을 수 있게 되었습니다.
Resume Auto-Scroll?