Combining Hair and MoGraph in Cineversity Brand ID: Style and Light Hair

Photo of Brett Morris

Instructor Brett Morris

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  • Duration: 06:02
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  • Made with Release: 18
  • Works with Release: 18 and greater

Bring the scene to production ready rendering by adding color variation to the hair material and lights to the scene.

All the foundations of the system are set up and working, though the rendering could be improved towards something that could be rendering into the ident. We’ll add two point lights in and position them to have a bright key and softer fill light, set both light’s shadows to ‘soft’, add a camera and position to see how the render looks. The add hue variation to the hair to add subtle changes in color to each strand of hair.

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Transcript

Hi, this is Brett Morris, and in this video, we'll add some color variation to the hair materials as well as adding some lights, shadows, to make it a more production ready render. So let's start off by creating some lights and let's just get a regular light, make sure that we can see our axis, and we'd like to start off by adjusting the Details tab to Falloff Inverse Square and that gives us more realistic falloff of light and it also gives us a nice visual representation of how the light is going to affect the object based off this proximity sphere. So for this light we're actually going to name this one key and let's adjust this to be the kind of top right and a little bit behind, and if we render this, we can see it's a little bit brighter at the top. We've got a little bit of falloff. We can certainly keep amending this, but one thing that's going to make this a lot easier to view is if we can go full screen here. Let's adjust the shadows to soft, come to the Shadow tab, adjust the Shadow Map to 750x750, and now when we render, we've got a nice bright hit of light on the top right and then we've got that nice falloff to darkness because this shadow is being created. So this isn't totally finished. It'd be nice to have a second light, which we'll call a fill, and for placement of this, let's go to our four window. Let's put the fill a little bit in front and probably bottom left, and you can see we've got a little bit of...it's not quite overlapping yet but it's quite easy just to make sure that both lights have a little bit of overlap to make sure that we're getting full coverage of the object. And if we hit render now, it's pretty even but let's just make some adjustments to our fill. Maybe if we drop it down to 50%, starting to get a nice little falloff here. The fill is way too bright, so I think if we drop this down to 30%, it's starting to feel a little bit nicer. I know I usually like a little bit of coolness in my fill and a little bit of warmth in my key, so I'm just going to adjust these colors a tad, and if we render now, this is starting to look a little bit nicer. I might just de-saturate that a little bit. Okay. So this is a pretty good starting point. Like I said, we can always amend these lights as we go along. The great thing about rendering hair in Cinema is that the standard renderer is lightning fast, so even if we boosted the hair count at 10x of what we've got, we're still gonna be looking at renders that are in a handful of seconds. So lighting is always a breeze with hair because of just simply how fast it is to render. Okay. So the next thing we'd like to do is select both our hair materials. Let's go to a full screen, get a nice adjustment on that composition, and with the two materials selected, what we'd like to do is give a little bit of variation to this color gradient. With the hair material, we're actually given a ton of control with color variation with this one little parameter down here. So this variation parameter here represents hue, saturation, and value, and if we increase this percentage, what happens is, if we look at one of these knots, we're sitting in this kind of blue, not quite cyan...or a little bit cyan, but we're sitting in this blue range, so if we increase this hue percentage, we're actually going to adjust a randomness to spread wider on the right and left and each strand of hair is randomly going to choose one of the colors that sits in that range. So to clearly identify what's going on, we can see we're looking at a pretty uniform blue and a uniform orange range, but if we increase this to 10% and render, you can see now with that one little parameter, the oranges, some are drifting a little bit more yellow, they're also going to a little bit more red, and then the blues, a little bit of purple, a little bit more cyan. So this is a great way of just adding variation to the color. You get it for free almost. It's so easy to continue playing with these setting to get it just right. It's always nice to add a little bit of saturation and value randomness in there. I'm looking at this and I'm thinking I can make the blues a little bit more rich, so I'm going to come over to the blue material and kind of maybe add a little bit more saturation and get this guy up a little bit. So now, yeah, you can see it's a little bit more saturated. It might be a little bit too saturated there, but at least this way it's super quick to make these adjustments. Creatively, just there's so much freedom to dial this in exactly the range that you're looking for. So I really enjoy working with hair for this reason, because it's just fun. So this is looking pretty good. We can obviously dial the randomness of the orange back a little bit and that's starting to feel pretty good. In this video, we added a key and fill light, we positioned them to give our play button a little bit more style. We also added variation to each of the hair materials color gradient and started to dial in our look. In the next video, we'll be adding some forces to bring the dynamic hair to life.
Hi, this is Brett Morris, and in this video, we'll add some color variation to the hair materials as well as adding some lights, shadows, to make it a more production ready render. So let's start off by creating some lights and let's just get a regular light, make sure that we can see our axis, and we'd like to start off by adjusting the Details tab to Falloff Inverse Square and that gives us more realistic falloff of light and it also gives us a nice visual representation of how the light is going to affect the object based off this proximity sphere. So for this light we're actually going to name this one key and let's adjust this to be the kind of top right and a little bit behind, and if we render this, we can see it's a little bit brighter at the top. We've got a little bit of falloff. We can certainly keep amending this, but one thing that's going to make this a lot easier to view is if we can go full screen here. Let's adjust the shadows to soft, come to the Shadow tab, adjust the Shadow Map to 750x750, and now when we render, we've got a nice bright hit of light on the top right and then we've got that nice falloff to darkness because this shadow is being created. So this isn't totally finished. It'd be nice to have a second light, which we'll call a fill, and for placement of this, let's go to our four window. Let's put the fill a little bit in front and probably bottom left, and you can see we've got a little bit of...it's not quite overlapping yet but it's quite easy just to make sure that both lights have a little bit of overlap to make sure that we're getting full coverage of the object. And if we hit render now, it's pretty even but let's just make some adjustments to our fill. Maybe if we drop it down to 50%, starting to get a nice little falloff here. The fill is way too bright, so I think if we drop this down to 30%, it's starting to feel a little bit nicer. I know I usually like a little bit of coolness in my fill and a little bit of warmth in my key, so I'm just going to adjust these colors a tad, and if we render now, this is starting to look a little bit nicer. I might just de-saturate that a little bit. Okay. So this is a pretty good starting point. Like I said, we can always amend these lights as we go along. The great thing about rendering hair in Cinema is that the standard renderer is lightning fast, so even if we boosted the hair count at 10x of what we've got, we're still gonna be looking at renders that are in a handful of seconds. So lighting is always a breeze with hair because of just simply how fast it is to render. Okay. So the next thing we'd like to do is select both our hair materials. Let's go to a full screen, get a nice adjustment on that composition, and with the two materials selected, what we'd like to do is give a little bit of variation to this color gradient. With the hair material, we're actually given a ton of control with color variation with this one little parameter down here. So this variation parameter here represents hue, saturation, and value, and if we increase this percentage, what happens is, if we look at one of these knots, we're sitting in this kind of blue, not quite cyan...or a little bit cyan, but we're sitting in this blue range, so if we increase this hue percentage, we're actually going to adjust a randomness to spread wider on the right and left and each strand of hair is randomly going to choose one of the colors that sits in that range. So to clearly identify what's going on, we can see we're looking at a pretty uniform blue and a uniform orange range, but if we increase this to 10% and render, you can see now with that one little parameter, the oranges, some are drifting a little bit more yellow, they're also going to a little bit more red, and then the blues, a little bit of purple, a little bit more cyan. So this is a great way of just adding variation to the color. You get it for free almost. It's so easy to continue playing with these setting to get it just right. It's always nice to add a little bit of saturation and value randomness in there. I'm looking at this and I'm thinking I can make the blues a little bit more rich, so I'm going to come over to the blue material and kind of maybe add a little bit more saturation and get this guy up a little bit. So now, yeah, you can see it's a little bit more saturated. It might be a little bit too saturated there, but at least this way it's super quick to make these adjustments. Creatively, just there's so much freedom to dial this in exactly the range that you're looking for. So I really enjoy working with hair for this reason, because it's just fun. So this is looking pretty good. We can obviously dial the randomness of the orange back a little bit and that's starting to feel pretty good. In this video, we added a key and fill light, we positioned them to give our play button a little bit more style. We also added variation to each of the hair materials color gradient and started to dial in our look. In the next video, we'll be adding some forces to bring the dynamic hair to life.
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